1. Does your State maintain a national system for controlling or regulating:

[ Articles 3, 4, 5.2, 8, 9, and 10 ]

Export Yes
Import Yes
Transit / Transshipment by land Yes
Transit / Transshipment by sea Yes
Transit / Transshipment by air Yes
Brokering Yes
2. For which activities does your State maintain a national control list of conventional arms:

[ Articles 2.2 and 5.2 ]

Export Yes
Import No
Transit / Transshipment Yes
Brokering Yes
3. Does your national control list cover the following:

[ Articles 2.1, 3, 4, and 5.2 ]

Battle tanks [Article 2.1] Yes
Armored combat vehicles [Article 2.1] Yes
Large-caliber artillery systems [Article 2.1] Yes
Combat aircraft [Article 2.1] Yes
Attack helicopters [Article 2.1] Yes
Warships [Article 2.1] Yes
Missiles and missile launchers [Article 2.1] Yes
Small arms and light weapons [Article 2.1] Yes
Ammunition / Munitions for the above items [Article 3] Yes
Parts and components requiring control for the above items [Article 4] Yes
4. Is/are your national control list(s) publicly available?

[ Article 5.3 ]

1) If yes, please provide a copy or link to where your control list is made publicly available 2) If no, please provide a copy of your control list or provide information on the additional items that are covered Yes
http://www.isp.se/documents/Regelverk/FM...
4a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
The control list is an annex to the Swedish Military Equipment Ordinance (SFS 1992:1303). The list is in line with the Common Military List of the European Union which lists equipment covered by Directive 2009/43/EC on intra-EU-transfers of defence-related products (ICT).
5. Are the controlled items defined?

[ Article 5.3 ]

1) if yes, which definition(s) do you use? (e.g. Wassenaar, United Nations Register of Conventional Arms, National definitions, etc.) Yes
The Wassenaar Arrangement. The Wassenaar Arrangement Military List does not differentiate between military equipment for combat purposes (MEC) and other military equipment (OME). The Swedish military list is therefore complemented with a division into MEC and OME. The MEC category includes equipment with a destructive impact including sights for such equipment and fire control equipment. The OME category includes parts and components for MEC, as well as equipment that do not have a directly destructive impact in a combat situation.
1. Is the control of arms exports established in national legislation?

[ Article 5.5 ]

Yes
1a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
Military Equipment Act (1992:1300) and the Military Equipment Ordinance (1992:1303). The legislation is publicly available at www.notisum.se but is only available in Swedish.
2. Which Ministry/ies or government agency/ies is/are responsible for implementing controls on arms exports?

[ Article 5.5 ]

The Swedish Inspectorate for Strategic Products, ISP, is the competent government agency responsible for implementing controls on arms export. This work is done in close co-operation with other authorities such as the Swedish Customs. The Swedish Police is responsible for authorisation of transfers of civilian firearms and ammunition within the European Union..
3. Which Ministry or agency leads this process?

[ Article 5.5 ]

The ISP is an independent authority under the Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs. The MFA provides overall policy guidance; the ISP is responsible for individual licensing decisions, independently. The government (or a minister) is not allowed to influence decision-making in individual cases. This limitation is constitutionally enshrined and intended to ensure impartial application of the law.
4. Does your State take measures to ensure that all authorizations are detailed and issued prior to export?

[ Article 7.5 ]

If yes, what measures does your State take to ensure that all authorizations are detailed and issued prior to export? Yes
The Swedish Export Controls Legislation in Sweden is prohibitive, which means that all exports of military equipment are a priori prohibited, and only allowed if an exemption in the form of an export license is granted.
5. Can your State reassess an authorization if your State becomes aware of new and relevant information?

[ Article 7.7 ]

Yes
5a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
According to the Swedish Military Equipment Act (SFS1992:1300), the Swedish Inspectorate for Strategic Products have the authority to revoke a granted license permanently or for a specific period of time. The ISP can revoke a granted license if a licensee does not fulfill the requirements stipulated in the legislation, requirements stipulated in a specific license or if there are any other particular reason to revoke a granted license.
6. Does your State maintain records of arms export authorizations?

[ Article 12.1 ]

Yes
6a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
Swedish government authorities are required by law to save their records. Instructions for culling archives are provided individually to each authority. According to the instruction to the Swedish Inspectorate for Strategic Products, the ISP is required to report to the Government every year statistics over granted export licenses and actual exports. This report may be regarded as a record in the sense of Article 12.1 of the treaty. In addition to this requirement ISP, as every government agency, is obliged by law to maintain record of all incoming- and outgoing communications, as well as in-house analyses and decisions taken.
7. For how many years are records maintained?

[ Articles 12.1 and 12.4 ]

The ISP has no culling instruction; therefore its records are stored indefinitely.
8. What information do the records contain?

[ Article 12.3 ]

Quantity Yes
Value Yes
Model / Type Yes
Importing State Yes
End-User Yes
Other (specify below) No
8a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
9. Does your State maintain records of actual arms exports?

[ Article 12.1 ]

Yes
9a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
Holders of export licenses are obliged by law to report actual arms exports to the Swedish Inspectorate of Strategic Products annually. Thus, the ISP possesses information both on licenses granted and on actual exports from Sweden.
10. For how many years are records maintained?

[ Articles 12.1 and 12.4 ]

See question 7. Actual arms exports are reported to the Swedish Inspectorate of Strategic Products every year. Records are kept indefinitely.
11. What information do the records contain?

[ Article 12.3 ]

Quantity Yes
Value Yes
Model/ Type Yes
Importing State Yes
End-User Yes
Transit/ transshipment State(s) No
Other (specify below) No
12. Please provide any other information on export practices you would like to share.
Under the Swedish Military Equipment Act (SFS1992:1300), export licenses may only be granted if security and defense policy reasons support this, and provided there is no conflict with Sweden\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s foreign policy. The national guidelines for licensing assessment were adopted in 1992. They represented Government practice at that time. Upon adoption, the guidelines were approved also by the Swedish parliament (Riksdag). Assessments of significant new cases are conducted in collaboration with a special advisory board consisting of representatives of all parties in Parliament. Under this oversight, interpretation of the guidelines has evolved over time in a case law fashion. In addition to national rules concerning the export of military equipment the EU member states have chosen to coordinate their export control policies while retaining national decision-making authority. The EU Code of Conduct on Arms Exports, adopted in 1998, specified common criteria for exports of military equipment, applicable in conjunction with national guidelines in the assessments of export applications. Member states are free to apply stricter national guidelines. The Code of Conduct was strengthened in 2005, and was adopted as a Common Position in 2008 (2008/944/CFSP). In 2013, a review the EU Common Position on Arms Exports was concluded in accordance with its Article 15. The first part of the Common Position contains eight criteria that must all be taken into consideration before deciding whether to approve arms exports to a given country. These criteria concern:
  • the situation in the recipient country;
  • the situation in the recipient country’s region; and
  • the exporting country and recipient country\\\\\\\'s international undertakings.
After ratifying the Arms Trade Treaty, the ISP will apply the criteria set out in article 7 of the treaty, in parallel with the national guidelines and the EU Common Position. In its bill to the Parliament, the Government has stressed that all three shall have equal weight.
1. Is the regulation of arms imports established in national legislation?

[ Article 8.2 ]

No
1a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
Import of civilian firearms and ammunition are covered by the Firearms Act (1996:67), supplemented by the Firearms Ordinance (1996:70). Imports of military equipment do not require an import license.
2. Which Ministry/ies or government agency/ies is/are responsible for regulating arms imports?

[ Article 5.5 ]

The Swedish Police and the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency are responsible for regulating the import of civilian firearms and ammunition.
3. Which Ministry or agency leads this process?

[ Article 5.5 ]

Ministry of Justice, the Swedish Police
4. What measures does your State take to regulate imports?

[ Article 8.1 ]

Sweden has no import licensing system as such but our national control system gives us the ability to interdict shipments that pass through our land territory in contravention of Article 6 of the ATT and the equivalent national and EU guidelines. Against this background, the Government is not considering introducing a general licensing system for imports of arms into Swedish legislation.
5. Does your State have measures in place to ensure that appropriate and relevant information is available to exporting States as part of their export assessment process?

[ Articles 8.1 and 11.3 ]

Yes
5a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
End user assurances are normally provided by the importer, i.e. the Swedish Armed Forces or a defense industry entity. If required, the ISP can issue assurances. International Import Certificates (IICs) are issued by the Swedish Chamber of Commerce. On occasion, end user assurances may be incorporated into a government-to-government agreement.
6. Does your State maintain records of arms imports?

[ Article 12.2 ]

Yes
6a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
Records are maintained by the Swedish Armed Forces, the defense industry, and civilian arms, by Swedish customs.
7. For how many years are records maintained?

[ Articles 12.2 and 12.4 ]

See question 7 from the section on exports. The Swedish Armed Forces have no general culling instructions and thus keep their records indefinitely. Swedish customs have instructions for culling archives. Records for civilian arms import are kept for at least six years.
8. What information do the records contain?

[ Article 12.3 ]

Quantity Yes
Value Yes
Model / type Yes
Exporting State Yes
Transit / transshipment State(s) No
Other (please specify below) No
9. Please provide any other information on import practices you would like to share.
Import of firearms and ammunition are regulated in Swedish legislation. The lack of import controls is explained by the presence of other controls. Importers of military equipment are either the Swedish Armed Forces, under direct government control, or the defence industry, under detailed supervision by the ISP. Other importers’ trade or possession of lethal equipment is covered by the Firearms Act (1996:67).
1. Is the regulation of transit and/or transshipment established in national legislation?

[ Article 9 ]

If yes, please provide the definition of transit and/or transshipment in your national legislation Yes
In Sweden’s export control legislation, transit is defined only in relation to intra-EU trade for which simplified rules apply. Transshipment is not defined. Transits through- and transshipments on Swedish territory are treated as exports (requiring a license) when exiting our national territory.
1a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
2. Which Ministry/ies or government agency/ies is/are responsible for regulating arms transit and/or transshipment?

[ Article 5.5 ]

The Swedish Inspectorate for Strategic Products.
3. Which Ministry or agency leads this process?

[ Article 5.5 ]

Ministry for Foreign Affairs and ISP. Refer to question 3 under the Exports section
4. What measures does your State take to regulate transit and/or transshipment under its jurisdiction?

[ Article 9 ]

Transit and transshipment are included in the definition of transfer and thus regulated in the Military Equipment Act (SFS 1992:1300) and in subsequent ordinance. Transit and transshipment through Swedish jurisdiction is subject to a licensing requirement upon exit, equivalent to the export licensing requirement for military equipment.
5. Does your State maintain records of arms that are authorized to transit and/or transship territory under its jurisdiction?

[ Articles 12.2 and 12.4 ]

Yes
5a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
6. For how many years are records maintained?

[ Article 12.4 ]

Indefinitely. See question 7 from the section on exports.
7. What information do the records contain?

[ Article 12.3 ]

Quantity Yes
Value Yes
Model / Type Yes
Exporting State Yes
Importing State Yes
Transit / Transshipment Yes
End-User Yes
Other (please specify below) No
7a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
8. Please provide any other information on transit and/or transshipment practices you would like to share.
1. Is the regulation of arms brokering established in national legislation?

[ Article 10 ]

If yes, please provide the definition of brokering used in your national legislation Yes
The Military Equipment Act regulates brokering. The definition covers Swedish authorities, companies and anyone domiciled in Sweden or living here on a regular basis, regardless if the brokering takes place in Sweden or abroad. Swedish citizens domiciled abroad are also covered.
1a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
2. Which Ministry/ies or government agency/ies is/are responsible for implementing controls on arms brokering?

[ Article 5.5 ]

The Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs and the Inspectorate for Strategic Products. Refer to question 3 under the export section
3. Which Ministry or agency leads this process?

[ Article 5.5 ]

The Swedish Inspectorate for Strategic Products.
4. Does your State take measures to regulate brokering taking place under your jurisdiction?

[ Article 10 ]

If yes, what measures does your State take to regulate brokering taking place under your jurisdiction? Yes
As with exports, brokering is regulated on the basis of an outright prohibition in the Swedish Military Equipment Act (1992:1300) para 4. Exceptions require explicit permission. Brokering is subject to a licensing procedure in every individual case. Brokers are also required obtain a permit in order to be active in this area (which in practice is equivalent to maintaining a register). A restrictive approach is taken to issuing such permits, as they fall under the same basic requirement as exports: if security and defense policy needs justify it, and provided there is no conflict with Sweden\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s foreign policy.
5. Please provide any other information on brokering practices you would like to share.
1. Does your State prohibit transfers of conventional arms:

[ Article 6 ]

If the transfer would violate obligations under measures adopted by the United Nations Security Council acting under Chapter VII, in particular arms embargoes? [Article 6.1] Yes
If the transfer would violate relevant international obligations under international agreements to which you are a party, in particular those relating to the transfer of, or illicit trafficking in, conventional arms? [Article 6.2] Yes
If you have knowledge at the time of authorization that the arms or items covered by your State's legislation would be used in the commission of genocide, crimes against humanity, grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions of 1949, attacks directed against civilian objects or civilians protected as such, or other war crimes as defined by international agreements to which you are a party? [Article 6.3] Yes
1a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
2. Please provide a list of the relevant international agreements to which you are a party.

[ Articles 6.2 and 6.3 ]

  • UN Charter (UN arms embargoes)
  • Council common position 2008/944/CFSP of 8 December 2008 defining common rules governing control of exports of military technology and equipment
  • OSCE arms control instruments
  • UN Firearms protocol, implemented I EU-law through regulation (EU) No 258/2012
  • Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction
  • Convention on Cluster Munitions
  • The Missile Technology Control Regime
  • The Wassenaar Arrangement
  • The Hague Code of Conduct
  • Directive 2009/43/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 May 2009 simplifying terms and conditions of transfers of defense-related products within the Community
  • The Arms Trade Treaty
  • Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court
  • Convention (I) for the Amelioration of the Condition of the Wounded and Sick in Armed Forces in the Field
  • Convention (II) for the Amelioration of the Condition of Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked Members of Armed Forces at Sea
  • Convention (III) relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War
  • Convention (IV) relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War
  • Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of International Armed Conflicts
  • Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of Non-International Armed Conflicts
  • Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict including additional protocols
  • Convention on the Prohibition of Military or any other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques
  • Protocol for the Prohibition of the Use of Asphyxiating, Poisonous or Other Gases, and Warfare
  • Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction
  • Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May be Deemed to be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects inclusive Amendment and Protocols
  • Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction.
3. Please provide any other information on prohibitions you would like to share.
Prohibitions contained in the Swedish guidelines, the EU Common Position and (after ratification) the ATT, are applied in parallel.
1. Does your State always conduct a risk assessment prior to authorization of an arms export?

[ Article 7.1 ]

If no, please specify under which conditions a risk assessment is not required. Yes
A risk assessment is always required, but the Swedish legislation and guidelines contain a positive presumption in certain cases (e.g. exports to Nordic Countries or EU Member States, intra-EU trade). According to the Swedish Guidelines, such positive presumptions are just that. They do not obviate the requirement for an assessment and they are void if a situation covered by Art 6 of the Treaty (or the equivalent in the Common Position or the Swedish Guidelines) is encountered.
1a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
2. Does your State require that the following criteria are included in your national assessment prior to granting an export authorization?

[ Article 7.1 ]

Whether the arms would contribute to or undermine peace and security? Yes
Whether the arms could be used to commit or facilitate a serious violation of international humanitarian law? Yes
Whether the arms could be used to commit or facilitate a serious violation of international human rights law? Yes
Whether the arms could be used to commit or facilitate an act constituting an offence under international conventions or protocols relating to terrorism to which your State is a party? Yes
Whether the arms could be used to commit or facilitate an act constituting an offence under international conventions or protocols relating to transnational organized crime to which your State is a party? Yes
2a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
3. Are additional criteria considered in addition to the above prior to authorizing a transfer:

[ Articles 7.4 and 11.2 ]

Risk of diversion Yes
Acts of gender based violence Yes
Other (please specify below) Yes
The Swedish guidelines require an overall assessment taking into account not only factors explicitly mentioned but also all other relevant factors – this allows for the development over time of international norms without the need for constant revisions of the national guidelines.
3a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
In addition to the criteria under question 2, the following elements are considered in the Swedish guidelines :
  • Necessity from a Swedish security policy perspective (exports are conceived as supporting the maintenance of a defence industry geared to Swedish needs).
  • Compatibility with the goals and principles of Swedish foreign policy (blanket formulation to cover relevant factors whether or not they are explicitly mentioned in the guidelines).
  • Is the end user a government, a government authority or a government authorized recipient? • Has an acceptable end user assurance (or own production declaration) been received?
  • Has the recipient state respected previous end user assurances, or rectified problems in this area? (otherwise no further exports)
  • Does the export consist of spare parts, components or consumables for previously exported systems? (a positive presumption for such cases, but not in situations covered by 6.A.i-iii)
  • Is the recipient a Nordic Country or EU Member State? (a positive presumption for such cases, but not in situations covered by 6.A.i-iii)
  • Is the equipment in question lethal or non-lethal? (a more positive presumption for non-lethal equipment, but not in situations covered by 6.A.i-iii)
In addition to the criteria under question 2, the following elements are considered in the EU Common Position:
  • The national security of EU Member States as well as that of friendly and allied countries
  • The behavior of the buyer country as regards in particular its attitude to terrorism, the nature of its alliances and respect for international law.
  • The risk of diversion
  • Compatibility of the export with the technical and economic capacity of the recipient country, taking into account the desirability that states should meet their legitimate security and defense needs with the least diversion of human and economic resources for armaments.
4. Does your State consider risk mitigation measures as part of its authorizations process?

[ Article 7.2 ]

If yes, what mitigation measures does your State consider (i.e. confidence building measures or jointly developed and agreed programs)? Yes
Sweden may on an ad hoc basis provide assistance to security sector reform etc. that could be considered relevant here, but this is decided independently and any coincidence with export licensing cases would be purely fortuitous. Caution would in any case be exercised in taking into account the results of such measures unless they have already been achieved.
4a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
5. Please provide any other information on risk assessment and/or mitigation practices you would like to share.
End user assurances are a form of risk mitigation that is obligatory according to the Swedish guidelines.
1. Does your State take preventative measures to mitigate the risk of diversion?

[ Article 11.2 ]

If yes, what preventative measures does your State take to mitigate the risk of diversion? Yes
Bona fide checks during the license assessment process. Requirement for end user/end use assurances. Denial of export or transfer license if satisfactory results are not obtained in either of these respects.
2. Does your State cooperate and exchange information with States to mitigate the risk of diversion?

[ Article 11.3 ]

Yes
2a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
3. Does your State take appropriate measures when it detects a diversion of transferred conventional arms?
If yes, what appropriate measures does your State take when it detects a diversion of transferred conventional arms? Yes
If a diversion is established (for instance by serial no tracing of diverted weapons leading to ID of the original recipient, and a check of that recipient’s end use undertaking establishes that it does not cover the detected re-transfer) leads to an official request to the government concerned to determine the cause of diversion and to report back what measures are taken to avoid any recurrence. If satisfactory answers are not obtained, the Swedish guidelines prescribe that all exports to the country be curtailed (including follow-on deliveries of spare parts and consumables to equipment already transferred) until the situation has been resolved to the satisfaction of Sweden.
4. Is your State willing to share information on effective measures to address diversion?
If yes, what information is your State willing to share? Yes
Information is primarily exchanged plurilaterally, within EU and within the Wassenaar arrangement. Bilateral exchange between national intelligence authorities also occurs. The nature of the information provided by Sweden is decided case by case.
1. Which agency/ies is/are responsible for enforcing arms transfer controls?

[ Article 5.5 ]

Swedish Inspectorate for Strategic Products, Swedish Customs, Swedish Police, The Swedish Prosecution Authority and others.
2. Which Ministry or agency leads this process?

[ Article 5.5 ]

The Swedish Inspectorate for Strategic Products , with overall guidance provided by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs . Refer to question 3 under the export section
3. What measures does your State take to enforce national laws and regulations that implement the provisions of the Treaty?

[ Article 14 ]

Contraventions of the Military Equipment Act (1992:1300) are criminalized in that Act and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. Many subsidiary contraventions not specifically addressed in the Military Equipment Act (for instance document forgery or perjury) are punishable under the Swedish Penal Code.
4. Please provide any other information on enforcement practices you would like to share.
The authorities responsible for enforcing the arms transfer controls regularly holds consultation meetings in order to ensure and facilitate enforcement of the Swedish regulations.
1. Will your State provide an initial report within one year of entry into force on measures undertaken in order to implement the ATT?

[ Article 13.1 ]

Yes
1a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
2. Does your State produce an annual report on:

[ Article 13.3 ]

Authorized arms exports Yes
Authorized arms imports No
Actual arms exports Yes
Actual arms imports No
2a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
3. Are there legal impediments to the reporting requirements under the ATT?

[ Article 13.3 ]

No
3a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
But national secrecy legislation may require some aggregation of data
4. Can your State report on measures taken to address the diversion of transferred conventional arms?

[ Article 13.2 ]

Yes
4a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
But national secrecy legislation may require some limitation on the nature of information provided
5. Has your State designated a national contact point for the ATT?

[ Article 5.6 ]

Yes
5a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
In the bill to the Swedish Parliament on the ratification of the ATT, the Swedish Inspectorate for Strategic Products is proposed as national contact point for the ATT.
6. Please provide any other information on transparency practices you would like to share.
The Swedish Government’s annual report to Parliament on exports of military equipment and dual use goods is also translated into English. Both Swedish and English versions are made available on the internet. In order to guarantee an open society with access to information about the work of the Riksdag (Swedish parliament), Government and government agencies, the principle of public access to official documents has been incorporated into a general law, the Freedom of the Press Act. This openness gives the Swedish people the right to study public documents, a right which may be exercised when they so wish. This principle of public access is not limited in time. All public documents are archived and only in certain cases, are authorities given the right to make exceptions from this principle. The ISP has not been given this right. However, the access to public documents is always subject to a confidentiality assessment. The Public Access to Information and Secrecy Act (2009:400) and the Freedom of the Press Act (1949:105) regulate under what conditions public access can be limited. The initial presumption is always full access. Examples of factors that can justify redacting or withholding documents are: national security; Sweden’s relations with a foreign state or an international organization; inspection, control or other supervisory activities of a public authority; public economic interest; or the protection of the personal or economic circumstances of a private individual.
1. Is your State involved in cooperation measures that will help to implement the ATT?

[ Article 15.1 ]

Yes
1a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
2. Is your State currently involved in:

[ Articles 15 ]

Exchange of information on conventional arms transfers [Articles 15.2 and 15.3] Yes
Cooperative measures to prevent diversion [Article 15.4] Yes
Widest measures of assistance in investigations, prosecutions and judicial proceedings [Article 15.5] Yes
Measures to prevent corruption [Article 15.6] Yes
Development of best practices and lessons learned [Article 15.7] Yes
2a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
Sweden is engaged in EU, WA, and bilateral exchanges. In steering documents related to the Council Common Position 2008/944/CFSP defining common rules governing the control of exports of military technology and equipment transparency issues are addressed. These issues are related to transparency regarding expenses and acquisition of military equipment. Sweden is part to several multilateral agreements to prevent corruption. Sweden’s national anti-corruption legislation is contained in the Swedish Penal Code.
3. Does your State intend to pursue cooperation in:

[ Article 15 ]

Exchange of information on conventional arms transfers [Article 15.1, 15.2, and 15.3] Yes
Cooperative measures to prevent diversion [Article 15.4] Yes
Widest measure of assistance in investigations, prosecutions and judicial proceedings [Article 15.5] Yes
Measures to prevent corruption [Article 15.6] Yes
Development of best practices and lessons learned [Article 15.7] Yes
3a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
Sweden welcomes the broadening of contacts that the ATT will enable. Sweden would like to see cooperative work within the ATT framework on the development of best practices and guidelines, building upon what has already been achieved in other fora
1. Does your State require assistance to implement the provisions of the Arms Trade Treaty?

[ Article 16.1 ]

No
2. Does your State require:

[ Article 16.1 ]

Legal assistance No
Legislative assistance, including model legislation No
Assistance for institution building No
Technical assistance No
Financial assistance No
Material assistance No
Stockpile management assistance No
Disarmament, demobilization, or reintegration assistance No
Assistance with effective practices for implementation No
Other (please specify below) No
3. Is your State in a position to provide assistance to other States to enable implementation of the provisions of the Arms Trade Treaty?

[ Articles 16.1, 16.2, and 16.3 ]

If yes, please answer question 4. If no, please go straight to question 5. Yes
3a. Details / reference / web link / additional comments
4. Is your State in a position to provide:

[ Article 16.1 ]

Legal assistance Yes
Legislative assistance, including model legislation Yes
Assistance for institution building Yes
Technical assistance Yes
Financial assistance Yes
Material assistance Yes
Stockpile management assistance Yes
Disarmament, demobilization, or reintegration assistance Yes
Assistance with effective practices for implementation Yes
Other (please specify below) Yes
Sweden can provide assistance both in-kind (expertise) and funding through different budget lines, including ODA. Assistance can be provided depending on needs. Sweden is open to suggestions of alternative forms of assistance.
5. Please provide information on any additional needs required to implement the ATT, particularly with regard to legal, licensing, customs, awareness raising and enforcement of sanctions, reporting, and transparency

[ Articles 16.1 and 16/2 ]

Useful for the future would be the alignment of customs tariffs in the Harmonized System administered by the WCA with the categories of export control lists. This would simplify the generation of trade statistics for national reporting purposes and the analysis of trade flows for export control purposes
6. Please provide information on any specific assistance programs that your State has provided that may help others implement the ATT, particularly with regard to legal, licensing, customs, awareness raising and enforcement of sanctions, reporting, and transparency

[ Articles 16.1 and 16.2 ]

Contribution(s) to the UNSCAR fund, support for NGO initiatives, participation in EU outreach and implementation assistance programs.
7. Please provide information on specific assistance your State has received through the United Nations, international, regional, subregional or national organizations, non-governmental organizations, or on a bilateral basis that could be considered relevant for ATT implementation

[ Article 16.2 ]

None.
1. Has your State already signed the Arms Trade Treaty?
Yes
2. Has your State already ratified the Arms Trade Treaty?
Yes
3. Is your State preparing to sign the Arms Trade Treaty in the next two years?
N/A
4. Is your State preparing to ratify the Arms Trade Treaty in the next two years?
N/A
5. Will/Has your State forumalted one or more reservations upon ratification?

[ Article 25.1 ]

If yes, please provide a description of your reservation(s). No
6. Please provide any other information you would like to share.
Sweden will apply provisionally Articles 6 and 7 of the Treaty (as provided for in Article 23), pending its entry into force.